First Aid/CPR/AED Instructor Training

Tuesday, June 26 2018
7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

 

Purpose/Gap

Athletic trainers are required by the BOC to maintain Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC) certification. This creates the need for more access to ECC instructors. It is anticipated that athletic department programs, in best practice, will also certify their coaches and staff/faculty in CPR. The ATs who attend this training will be positioned to provide that training. This increases ATs involvement in disseminating this information and is another way to heighten ATs visibility and contributions.

Completion of the course certifies students to teach CPR, AED and First Aid and Lay Responder Training and if they choose to do so participants will also be able to bridge online to be able to teach the CPR/PRO classes.

The certification will be through American Red Cross (ARC.)

A recertification of CPR/PRO will be conducted at the beginning of the course. Successful participants will receive their ECC card, which satisfies the BOC requirement, and their instructor certification will be entered, by the instructor, into their ARC profile.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify the tools necessary to conduct an American Red Cross (AR) CPR/AED/FA course.
  • Apply the different lessons while evaluating their skills and techniques.
  • Explain all skills associated with CPR for the Professional Rescuer.

Instructor
Leonard Angelli, MS, ATC, LAT

Category
CEUs are not issued for this course. However, the BOC has indicated that 4 CEUs can be claimed under Category D.

Audience: ATs – certified professionals and associates

Cost: $410 for members and $510 for non-members.

Requirements
Students must provide proof of a valid FA/CPR/AED Red Cross certificate. Enrollment is for both the online and live course. The online course must be completed prior to class attendance. Access to the online course will be provided by Mr. Angelli.

Students must bring a pocket mask and have access to a digital or paper copy of the instructors and participant manual.

Course Outline

  • Introduction
  • Recertification for CPR/PRO – Students will be tested on their CPR/AED skills at the beginning of the class, and must be able to perform all of the skills properly without hesitation.
  • Lecture – Attendees will be led in the pedagogy of becoming a qualified ARC instructor.
  • Lab – The course is designed to have each student lead three practice teaching sessions throughout the course of the day. The sessions are staged from basic skill steps leading up to complete full lesson delivery. Each candidate will also provide feedback to each of their classmates. They will also be given feedback by the instructor team. The outcomes of each session will determine the participant’s readiness to successfully pass the class.
  • Evaluation – Upon completion of the course work, each instructor candidate will have ample time to ask questions prior to taking the exam at the end of the class. The instructors will complete a multiple-choice test consisting of 25 questions which must be passed with a score of 80% or better.

Level: Advanced

 


 

Assisting Individuals in Crisis

ATs Care Committee Pre-Conference 2-Day Workshop
Monday, June 25 and Tuesday, June 26
9:00am-5:00pm; 7:30am-3:30pm

 

Purpose/Gap

Athletic Trainers identified during a research survey that while many have been directly affected by a critical incident during their professional or personal lives, they do not feel adequately prepared to respond during the aftermath of a critical incident with crisis intervention.

Crisis Intervention is NOT psychotherapy; rather, it is a specialized acute emergency mental health intervention, which requires specialized training. As physical first aid is to surgery, crisis intervention is to psychotherapy. Thus, crisis intervention is sometimes called “emotional first aid”. This program is designed to teach participants the fundamentals of, and a specific protocol for, individual crisis intervention. This course is designed for anyone who desires to increase their knowledge of individual (one-on-one) crisis intervention techniques in the fields of Business & Industry, Crisis Intervention, Disaster Response, Education, Emergency Services, Employee Assistance, Healthcare, Homeland Security, Mental Health, Military, Spiritual Care, and Traumatic Stress.

Completion of this workshop is required to be eligible to apply for an ATs Care CISM team.

 

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Understand the natures and definitions of a psychological crisis and psychological crisis intervention
  • Understand the resistance, resiliency and recovery continuum
  • Understand the nature and definition of critical incident stress management and its role as a continuum of care
  • Practice basic crisis communication techniques
  • Be familiar with common psychological and behavioral crisis reactions
  • Understand the putative and empirically derived mechanisms of action in psychological crisis intervention
  • Practice the SAFER-Revised model of individual psychological crisis intervention
  • Understand how the SAFER-Revised model may be altered for suicide intervention
  • Understand and discuss the risks of iatrogenic “harm” associated with psychological crisis intervention and will further discuss how to reduce those risks.

 

Instructor – Timothy Neal, MS, ATC

Category: 13 CEUs can be claimed under Category D.

Audience: ATs – certified professionals and associates

Cost: $310 for members

Course Outline:

  • Psychological crisis and psychological crisis intervention
  • Resistance
  • Resiliency
  • Recovery continuum
  • Critical incident stress management
  • Evidence-based practice for intervention
  • Basic crisis communication techniques
  • Common psychological and behavioral crisis reactions
  • Putative and empirically derived mechanisms
  • SAFER-Revised model
  • Suicide intervention
  • Risks of iatrogenic “harm”.

Level: Essential


 

logo-Career   

Performing Arts Workshop

Tuesday, June 26
11:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

CEUs: 4.5

Cost: $67.50 for professionals

Outcomes

  • Identify performance techniques in performing artists, apply key examination procedures used, and discuss treatment and return to performance approaches.
  • Identify preventative measures in the performing artists and key assessment measures should an issue/injury occur.
  • Identify key objectives needed in designing, implementing, and maintaining a dance medicine program.

Target Audience: ATs currently in and interested in the performing arts settings.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced

Format: Lecture

 

Schedule

11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Building a Dance Medicine Program
Lindsay Gastright, MLA, ATC, LAT

 

Participants will be able to:

  • Analyze critical thinking and creative strategies to create a comprehensive dance medicine program.
  • Apply critical thinking and creative strategies to create a comprehensive dance medicine program.

Domain: Healthcare Administration and Professional Responsibility

 

12:15 – 1:00 p.m.

Concussions and Management for the Performing Artist
Gregory Stewart, MD

 

Participants will be able to:

  • Apply the latest research in concussion management to the performing artist population.

Domains: Examination, Assessment and Diagnosis; Immediate and Emergency Care; Therapeutic Intervention

 

1:00 – 1:15 p.m.

Break

 

1:15 – 2:00 p.m.

Theory of Planned Behavior-Based Predictors of Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Prevention Practices
Nancy Jean Burns, PhD, ATC

 

Participants will be able to:

  • Classify the salient beliefs on preventive exercises to prevent playing-related musculoskeletal disorders.
  • Summarize validity and reliability of Play-Related Musculoskeletal Disorder Care Questionnaire.
  • Develop recommendations for improving musculoskeletal health of college marching musicians.

Domain: Injury and Illness Prevention and Wellness Promotion; Therapeutic Intervention; Healthcare Administration and Professional Responsibility

 

2:00 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

A Comprehensive Approach to the Care of Active Women
Speaker Name: Mary Mulcahey, MD

 

Participants will be able to:

  • Analyze the benefits of using a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach for treatment of musculoskeletal issues.
  • Apply concepts of comprehensive medicine to their practice.

Domains: Examination, Assessment and Diagnosis, Therapeutic Intervention

 

2:45  – 3:00 p.m.

Break

 

3:00 – 3:45 p.m.

ENT Related Injuries in Musicians
Rizwan Aslam, DO, MS, FACS

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify important anatomical structures related to the voice
  • Identify the most common injuries related to musical injuries
  • Identify common treatments for ENT related injuries as the relate to singers and musicians

Domains: Examination, Assessment and Diagnosis; Therapeutic Intervention

 

3:45 – 4:30 p.m.

Integrating Yoga as a Tool for Injury Prevention, Recovery from Injury and Reduction of Stress in Dancers
Rebecca Hutchings, MD

 

Participants will be able to:

  • Restate rehab principles
  • Apply rehab principles to Yoga practice
  • Use a combination of rehab principles and combine with Yoga practice to design, demonstrate, and implement a yoga based therapeutic exercise program
  • Apply these principles as part of an injury prevention program

Domains: Injury and Illness Prevention and Wellness Promotion; Therapeutic Intervention

 


 

ICSM Summit Session Information

ICSM Summit Agenda (pdf)

 

CEUs : 2.5

 

Cost: $50

 

Delivery of Athletic Training Services in a Medical Model

 

Speaker: Charlie Thompson, MS, ATC

 

Summary:

Athletic Training services for intercollegiate student- athletes (S-A) is typically provided by medical personnel hired by the Athletic Department.  Recognizing that this model works well at many institutions, the model does have inherent possibilities of conflict when it comes to the health and well- being of the S-A.  Aside from the possibility of conflicts in this area, the model also allows for concerns regarding the hiring, evaluation, and retention decisions being made by non- medical personnel.  The medical model eliminates most if not all of those concerns, and the AT’s in the medical model are seen as “medical providers” by the institutions that employ them.

 

Objectives:

Participants will be able to:

  1. Point out the most common models of medical care for intercollegiate athletics, listing the positives and areas of possible conflict(s).
  2. Explain in detail what the components of a medical model are.
  3. Use a well- established medical model program to demonstrate how the model can work.
  4. Show how the medical model can work in conjunction with the Athletic Department to ensure a complete experience for the S-A.
  5. Identify information on how to get started for institutions desiring to move to the medical model.

Domain

Healthcare Administration and Professional Responsibility

Level: Essential

 

Are You Protected If You Get Sued?  Risk Management and Assessing the ATs liability by Utilizing the NATA’s Liability Toolkit

 

Speaker: Randy Cohen, ATC, DPT

 

Summary:

Traditionally athletic trainers have been insulated from malpractice litigation.  As more litigation is occurring primarily with concussion management athletic trainers are being forced to defend themselves.  Risk management and understanding liability coverage has not been traditionally taught to ATs as part of entry level education.   This presentation is valuable to fill the gap so the AT understands risk management, liability coverage and can determine if there are areas they need to do a better job protecting themselves.

 

Objectives

 

Participants will be able to:

  1. Distinguish the difference between protecting themselves from litigation and protecting their state license and how their employment status will impact each of these.
  2. Distinguish the medical standards of informed consent and consent to treat and how they apply to the practice of athletic training.
  3. Explain areas of risk for liability and develop strategies to minimize that risk.

Domain

Healthcare Administration and Professional Responsibility

Level: Advanced

 

Concussion Spotter Thoughts – Getting Everyone on the Same Page

 

Speaker: Rod Walters, DA, ATC

 

Summary:

In 2012, the National Football League imitated a program for utilization of non-league personnel to monitor games to provide further feedback to teams in the event of concussive injuries be encountered and not identified by team medical personnel. The 2016 Concussion Summit further identified the need for integration of video for further identifying concussive injuries and objectifying clinical assessments. The practice of nonteam personnel providing medical oversight specific to concussion was initiated in the collegiate game in 2016, and has quickly gained widespread support, though no universal plan of administration has been engaged. This presentation will address the issues related for the universal application of game-day administration of injured athletes, and identify obstacles that need to be addressed to allow fluid administration of concussions. Further, a model program is needed for further implementation at all levels of sport.

 

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  1. Analyze the incorporation of video review in game administration and concussion

management.

  1. Critique concussion monitoring in various leagues.
  2. Consider further improvements to administration of concussion management.

Domains

Examination, Assessment, and Diagnosis

Immediate and Emergency Care

Health Care Administration and Professional Responsibilities. Task 0502

Level: Advanced

Best Practices in Intercollegiate Sports Medicine

Speaker: Ron Courson, ATC, PT, NRAEMT, CSCS

Summary:

This presentation will review “Best Practices in Intercollegiate Sports Medicine” utilizing a variety of Consensus Statements from various sports medicine professional associations including the NATA, NCAA, ACSM, AMSSM, and AOSSM.  Emphasis will be placed upon athlete-centered medicine, the delivery of health care services that are focused on the individual athlete’s needs and concerns.

Objectives:

Participants will be able to:

The participant will understand:

  1. Recognize the concept of athlete-centered medicine.
  2. Evaluate duties and responsibilities of athletic health care team members.
  3. Recognize supervisory relationships and the chain of command within the athletic health care team.
  4. Develop decision making authority related to approval for participation of student athletes.
  5. Organize oversight for all programs and services that have the potential to affect the physical or mental health status of student–athletes.
  6. Design the implementation of best practices in prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries; pre-participation examinations; emergency action planning; strength and conditioning training; nutritional counseling; and behavioral medicine.

 

Domain:

Healthcare Administration and Professional Responsibility

 

Level: Essential

 

Athlete Centered Medical Care

Speaker:   Scott Anderson, ATC

Summary:

Intercollegiate athletics is performance driven.  Athletics programs, sports, and individuals are measured by wins & losses and championships won.  Athletes are individually motivated toward personal and team goals and may ignore signs and symptoms of injury to continue sport participation.  A common characteristic of injured athletes is a wont to return to the very activity in which they were injured, in some cases in the acute phase and prior to any remediation.  Performance becomes a practice parameter with the contemporary amalgamation of strength & conditioning coaches, sports nutritionists, sports psychologists, performance enhancement specialists, equipment managers, etc, into ‘performance teams’.  The college athletic trainer is the health care professional providing most of the primary athletics health care to collegiate athletes.  Athlete centered medical care is delivery of health care services that are focused on the individual athlete’s needs and concerns.  Athlete centered medical care forms the foundation for independent medical care wherein the collegiate athletics health care providers have clear authority for athlete care.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define athlete centered care.
  2. Per legislation, guidelines, standards, and tenets establishing independent medical care; illustrate the concepts into the design of athlete care plans.
  3. Explain how the integration of athlete centered care prioritizes administering medical care to the athletes by the athletic trainer.

Domain

Therapeutic Intervention

 

Level: Essential